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Wallaby Trail

Among Night Safari’s newest attractions, this captivating Wallaby Trail is inspired by the unique wildlife of the Australian Outback and highland forests. Here, you can look forward to some of Australia’s most fascinating nocturnal wildlife natives.

A hop and skip away from the main entrance of the park, this magnificent trail includes an immersive Ranger Station learning experience. This trail also highlights one of the few free-ranging Wallaby walk-through habitats in Asia, and the mysterious Naracoorte Cave with scorpions, venomous centipedes and other night crawling creatures.

 

Ranger Station

Begin your journey at the Ranger Station where you will get to see the taxidermised grey kangaroo and...

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Ranger Station

Begin your journey at the Ranger Station where you will get to see the taxidermised grey kangaroo and cassowary, two of Australia’s star wildlife. Learn more about these animals as well as other Australasia flora and fauna. Be prepared to spend some time here as you catch up on the fascinating back stories on the incredible wildlife Down Under.

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Sugar Gliders and Brush-tailed Possums

See two of Australia’s awesome possums – the sugar gliders and brush-tailed possums. While the...

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Sugar Gliders and Brush-tailed Possums

See two of Australia’s awesome possums – the sugar gliders and brush-tailed possums. While the nectar-loving sugar gliders, also known as gliding possums, love to jump for sweet tree sap and flower pollen in the wild, the brush-tailed possums have been known to eat smaller animals like rats. Both these tree dwellers are great climbers, thanks to their prehensile tails which help them to grasp hold of branches. Catch them at snack time and you’ll be able to see just how active they can be.

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Naracoorte Cave

Next, crawl into the chambers of Singapore’s first man-made cave with live inhabitants! Meander along...

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Naracoorte Cave

Next, crawl into the chambers of Singapore’s first man-made cave with live inhabitants! Meander along the dimly-lit subterranean passageways and marvel at the fossilised prehistoric animals on the limestone walls. With each unexpected blind corner, you could be in the company of the Ridley’s beauty snake (cave racers), tooth cave spiders, giant river toads, the Asian black forest scorpions and an army of roof rats. But don’t worry, we’ve our ways to enable you to ogle at them in close proximity without fear.

This cave was specially constructed to attract wild bats to build their home here. So watch out for these guests which are free to come and go.

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Free-ranging Wallabies

Making their home in the free-ranging exhibit are two species of the Kangaroo’s smaller cousin...

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Free-ranging Wallabies

Making their home in the free-ranging exhibit are two species of the Kangaroo’s smaller cousin – Bennett’s wallaby and the once-thought-extinct parma wallaby – roaming wild and free in the naturalistic habitat. A Bennett’s wallaby (also known as the red-necked wallaby) has a reddish wash across its shoulders, while a parma wallaby is a lot more shy and smaller in size. Spend some time observing their natural behaviour and you might be rewarded with a treat of having a wallaby hop up to you.

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Tawny Frogmouths and White-lipped Python

After you’ve managed to drag yourself away from the adorable wallabies, you’ll come to a...

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Tawny Frogmouths and White-lipped Python

After you’ve managed to drag yourself away from the adorable wallabies, you’ll come to a sheltered area featuring the tawny frogmouth and the white-lipped python. The tawny frogmouth has a beak that resembles the mouth of a frog. These birds are masters of camouflage, so keep your eyes peeled and you’ll be sure to see one roosting, still as a log, on an exposed tree branch. Opposite them is the white-lipped python. Observe it at close range through its glass observatory and you’ll understand where it got its name. These expert night predators have pits along their jaws to sense body heat for tracking down animals in dark dense forests. They can sniff their prey out with their forked tongues.

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